Oct
07

“Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health” The IOC Report

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In The News this week, a report published by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation titled, “Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health”, received great reviews by many in health care.

The AACN American Association of Critical Care Nurses issued the following press release this past week:

WASHINGTON, D.C., October 5, 2010 – Today, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) applauds the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation for their visionary report on the Future of the Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, which includes among its recommendations removing regulatory barriers to nursing practice, raising the education level of the nursing workforce, enhancing nursing’s leadership role in healthcare redesign, and strengthening data collection efforts.

The IOM is calling for policymakers, educators, and leaders across the profession to take collective action to reform education, strengthen nursing roles, and amplify nursing’s voice in transforming the healthcare system. “The IOM’s focus on the future of nursing comes at a time when healthcare reform presents new challenges and opportunities for the nursing workforce,” said AACN President Kathleen Potempa. “AACN stands ready to work with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and other stakeholders to ensure the report’s recommendations are implemented to enhance patient safety and the quality of care available to our nation’s diverse patient population.”

The four key messages that structure the recommendations in the Future of Nursing report include:

* Nurses should practice to the full extent of their education and training.

* Nurses should achieve higher levels of education and training through an improved education system that promotes seamless academic progression.

* Nurses should be full partners, with physicians and other healthcare professionals, in redesigning healthcare in the United States.

* Effective workforce planning and policy making require better data collection and an improved information infrastructure.

Specific action steps requiring a collaborative response include:

* Increasing the number of nurses with baccalaureate degrees from 50% to 80% by 2020 and encouraging nurses with associate degrees and diplomas to enter baccalaureate programs within five years of graduation.

* Doubling the number of nurses with a doctorate by 2020.

* Addressing the faculty shortage by creating salary and benefits packages that are market competitive.

* Moving to have at least 10% of baccalaureate program graduates enter master’s or doctoral degree programs within five years of graduation. * Removing scope of practice barriers that inhibit Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs) from practicing to the full extent of their education and training and serving in primary care roles.

* Enhancing new nurse retention by implementing transition-into-practice nurse residency programs.

* Embedding leadership development into nursing education programs and increasing the emphasis on interdisciplinary education.

* Ensuring that nurses engage in lifelong learning to gain the competencies needed to provide care for diverse populations across the lifespan.

“Implementing these recommendations will propel the nursing profession forward and better position nurses to become full partners in reforming our healthcare delivery system,” added Dr. Potempa. “AACN is committed to leveraging our influence, data resources, and extensive network of nurse educators to advance these recommendations to better meet the health needs of the nation.” The new report is the product of a study convened under the auspices of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Initiative on the Future of Nursing, at the Institute of Medicine, and is the result of the committee’s review of scientific literature on the nursing profession and a series of public forums to gather insights and evidence from a range of experts.  The expert committee leading this work was chaired by Dr. Donna Shalala, president of the University of Miami, and included among its members Dr. Michael Bleich, dean of the Oregon Health & Science University School of Nursing. AACN was pleased to provide testimony, consultation, and assistance with data requests to the IOM Committee while the report was in development.

The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) is the nationalvoice for university and four-year college education programs innursing. Representing more than 650 member schools of nursing at publicand private institutions nationwide, AACN’s educational, research,governmental advocacy, data collection, publications, and other programswork to establish quality standards for bachelor’s- and graduate-degreenursing education, assist deans and directors to implement thosestandards, influence the nursing profession to improve health care, andpromote public support of baccalaureate and graduate nursing education,research, and practice.

CONTACT: Robert Rosseter, 202-463-6930 rrosseter@aacn.nche.edu <mailto:rrosseter@aacn.nche.edu>

The AANA put out a news bulletin following the publication by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) visionary report on the Future of the Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health.  What follows is their News Report published October 5, 2010:

Park Ridge, Ill.—Landmark findings from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) assert that expanding the role of nurses in the U.S. healthcare system will help meet the growing demand for medical services. The IOM report urges policymakers to remove policy barriers that hinder nurses—particularly advanced practice registered nurses such as Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs)—from practicing to the full extent of their education and training.

The report, titled “The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health,” was released in the wake of two definitive studies recently published in leading peer-reviewed health journals that confirmed the safety and cost-effectiveness of nurse anesthetists.

“The new report from the Institute of Medicine is further evidence that all nurses, including advanced practice registered nurses, play an integral role in the U.S. health system,” said Paul Santoro, CRNA, president of the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA). “Millions of previously uninsured Americans are about to enter the system, and millions more baby boomers are coming eligible for the Medicare program. In conjunction with the recent RTI study that called for the repeal of the supervision rule, the IOM report shows it is long overdue that these highly qualified professionals be allowed to practice to the full extent of their capabilities, ensuring all Americans access to safe, affordable healthcare.”

The RTI study, titled “No Harm Found When Nurse Anesthetists Work Without Supervision by Physicians,” was published in the August 2010 issue of Health Affairs, the nation’s preeminent health policy journal. This study, which examined nearly 500,000 individual cases in 14 states that removed the federal physician supervision requirement for nurse anesthetists between 2001 and 2005, revealed that patient outcomes did not differ between the states that do not require physician supervision and states that do. Further, the study confirmed that there are no differences in patient outcomes when anesthesia services are provided by CRNAs, physician anesthesiologists, or CRNAs supervised by physicians.

In addition, the Lewin Group published a study titled “Cost Effectiveness Analysis of Anesthesia Providers” in the May/June issue of The Journal of Nursing Economic$. This study considered the different anesthesia delivery models in use in the United States today, including CRNAs acting solo, physician anesthesiologists acting solo, and various models in which a single anesthesiologist directs or supervises one to six CRNAs. The results show that CRNAs acting as the sole anesthesia provider cost 25 percent less than the second lowest cost model. Alternatively, the model in which one anesthesiologist supervises one CRNA is the least cost-efficient model.

CRNAs are anesthesia professionals with 7-8 years of education and training related to their specialty,  including a four-year bachelor’s in nursing, at least one year of experience as a registered nurse in an acute care setting, and a master’s degree from a 24-36 month nurse anesthesia educational program.  In addition, CRNAs must fulfill continuing education requirements every two years in order to remain certified to practice. By the year 2025, a doctorate of nursing anesthesia practice will be required for entry into the profession.

The IOM report was the work of the IOM’s committee on the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Initiative on the Future of Nursing, which consists of doctors, nurses, academicians, and other healthcare representatives.

The Health Affairs study referenced above is available at www.aana.com/optoutstudy.

The Nursing Economic$ study referenced above is available at www.aana.com/lewinstudy.aspx.

Here is a link to the IOM press release: http://www8.nationalacademies.org/onpinews/newsitem.aspx?RecordID=12956

Here is a link to a brief of the IOM report:
http://www.iom.edu/~/media/Files/Report%20Files/2010/The-Future-of-Nursing/Future%20of%20Nursing%202010%20Report%20Brief%20v2.pdf

The IOM report can be purchased at: http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=12956

Comments

  1. Ratika says:

    It is indeed a great challenge to get all the points mentioned to be implemented. It would be a great progress in this field of nursing. In addition, nurse anesthetist should also focus on adapting to automated Anesthesia EMR’s that would ease out their process easily.

  2. I am particularly impressed by the specific action steps that were issued by the American Association of Critical Care Nurses. I think this provides a valuable blueprint to take the advancement in all types of nursing care well into the future.

  3. lifenurse says:

    Agree, In addition, nurse anesthetist should also focus on adapting to automated Anesthesia EMR’s that would ease out their process easily.

  4. smith says:

    CRNAs are anesthesia professionals with 7-8 years of education and training related to their specialty, including a four-year bachelor’s in nursing, at least one year of experience as a registered nurse in an acute care setting, and a master’s degree from a 24-36 month nurse anesthesia educational program. In addition, CRNAs must fulfill continuing education requirements every two years in order to remain certified to practice. By the year 2025, a doctorate of nursing anesthesia practice will be required for entry into the profession.CRNAs are anesthesia professionals with 7-8 years of education and training related to their specialty, including a four-year bachelor’s in nursing, at least one year of experience as a registered nurse in an acute care setting, and a master’s degree from a 24-36 month nurse anesthesia educational program. In addition, CRNAs must fulfill continuing education requirements every two years in order to remain certified to practice. By the year 2025, a doctorate of nursing anesthesia practice will be required for entry into the profession.

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  6. I usually do not create a ton of comments, however I browsed some
    of the remarks here ?Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health? The IOC Report :
    : Nurse Anesthetist. I do have a few questions for you if it’s allright. Is it only me or do a few of the responses look as if they are written by brain dead visitors? 😛 And, if you are posting on additional online sites, I would like to follow everything fresh you have to post. Would you list of every one of all your shared sites like your twitter feed, Facebook page or linkedin profile?

  7. David says:

    Thank you,

    Twitter feed for students at. Come join the fun.

    SRNA_Cafe

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